Annual dinner with his eminence Bishop of Karpasia fr. Christoforos

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I N V I T A T I O N

You are cordially invited to join the dinner hosted by our bishop to all Orthodox converts, catechumens, and English Bible study members.  

Date/time:  Thursday 19th January 2017 at 7.00pm

Venue:  Reception hall of Agia Sophia Church - Strovolos

Price:  FREE

If you are interested to join please contact Gillian at 99932761 or Evgenia at 99944676  either by call or message stating your name/surname and the number of family members escorting you.  

Dead line to sign up:  Saturday the 14th of January 

ONLY FAMILY MEMBERS CAN JOIN (i.e. spouces and children) -  NO FRIENDS

PLEASE SIGN UP ONLY IF YOU ARE SURE YOU WILL ATTEND SO THAT NO FOOD WILL BE WASTED

St. John of Krostadt and the education of children

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A child’s soul is divine beauty 
 
St. John of Kronstadt considered love for children to be the foundation of a teacher’s work—a foundation that is very often denied by modern-day so-called technicians of secular educational sciences and activities. He said to the students of the gymnasium where he taught, “You are my children, for I gave birth to you and continue to give birth in you to the good tidings of Jesus Christ. My spiritual blood—my instructions—flow in your veins. You are my children, because I have you always in my heart and I pray for you. You are my children, because you are my spiritual offspring. You are my children, because truly, as a priest I am a father, and you call me “batiushka” (“little father”, an affectionate term for a priest).1 
 
In Fr. John lived a kind of unearthly, angelic love for children, which inspired him and motivated the entire educational process. It was a special gift of God’s grace, which burned in him so strongly that in later years, when he was no longer teaching, he often healed sick children with the power of love and prayer, continually blessing and instructing the

On the birth of Christ

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When we talk about the birth of Christ we are speaking of two births. One is the pre-eternal birth of the Word from the Father, according to the divine nature, and the other is the birth in time from the All-Holy Virgin, according to the human nature. This refers to Christ’s two natures: the divine and the human.
“The important thing is that this Word, before His birth in the flesh, is like the Father in every respect. He does not come from nothing. The Word has two births. One birth was before all ages and the other birth was in time, which is the birth as a man, the incarnation.”
 
This theological fact is revelational and above all it is empirical, as the glorified flesh of Christ becomes a source of life for the members of the Church, particularly the saints.
 
“It is not only the Old and New Testaments that clearly teach the fact that the Word, the Lord of Glory, Who is God by nature and co-essential (homoousios) with the Father, truly took flesh and was born in His own normal and separate humanity of the Virgin Mary – who is literally, really and truly the Theotokos or Mother of God. 

"Go ye therefore, and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit"

Mathew 28:19